Red Oak Value Increase

Table 4. Expected annual rate of value increase for red oak trees, in percent.
(from Trimble, G R and J J Mendel. 1969. The rate of value increase for northern red oak, white oak, and chestnut oak. USDA Forest Service Research Paper NE-129. Upper Darby, PA)

 

Due to growth only

Due to growth and quality increase2,3

Avgs
by DBH for all
factors
-KD

Vigor I

Vigor III

Vigor I

Vigor III

(inches)

S.I. 80

S.1. 50

S.I. 80

S.I. 50

S.I. 80

S.I. 50

S.I. 80

S.I. 50

14

28-30

21

13-15

12-14

42-46

37-40

34-37

34-36

29

16

8-27

5-20

4-15

3-14

22-40

19-35

17-33

16-32

19

18

6-12

4-8

3-6

2-5

16-22

14-19

12-17

12-16

11

20

5-9

3-5

2-4

1-3

13-17

11-14

10-13

10-12

8

22

4-6

2-3

2-3

1-2

11-45

9-43

9-42

8-41

14

24

3-4

-

1-2

-

9-10

-

8

-

3

26

2-3

-

1

-

9

-

7-8

-

2

28

2

-

0-1

-

8-9

-

7

-

2

30

2

-

-

-

8

-

7

-

2

1Based on 4/4 factory-grade lumber recovery. These rates can have a variation of 2 to 4 percent due to differences in location, volume estimates, and quality estimates.
2The high portion of the range in rates is due largely to low-grade trees that have a low present value and thus produce a relatively high rate of value increase when considered in the ratio Vn/Vo. For this reason, butt-log grade 3 logs have not been considered in the estimates "due to growth only."
3 The high rates of value increase in the 22-inch diameter class are due to the improvement of butt-log grade 3 trees to butt-log grade 2. KD Note: This is due to an artifact of the USFS tree grading system.

KD Notes:  S.I. means site index, in this case how tall trees will grow in 50 years.  The value increase rates do not include real market value increases or inflation, nor costs of management and risk.  The rates in this table are higher than the rates in my summary table because they are based on lumber values, not log values.  Most of that difference reflects profits to sawmills on lumber, especially from smaller logs.